Bloggers Unite for EndoMarch: Week Four – An Interview

February 12, 2014

I suppose it wouldn’t be a blogging challenge if I was on time with every post. This one is a bit late as it’s already Week Five (how did THAT happen?).
If you’d like a recap…
Week One: Basic Info
Week Two: Getting Personal
Week Three: An Open Letter to Congress

Part of ChancesOur’s EndoMarch Blogging Challenge is to interview someone going to the march. Given that so many of us in the Twitterverse and Blogosphere do not live near one another this interview was conducted via email.

Here’s what Jackie has to say:

1. Why are you going to EndMarch? What specifically made you decide to go?

I’m going to EndoMarch because this disease has been a major part of my life since I was a teenager. I wasn’t diagnosed until the age of 25, however, I have dealt with the pain since I was 12 years old. It’s affected me both physically and mentally. I’ve undergone two laparoscopies to excise my endo, however it always grows back, and it seems the pain gets worse every time. The major reason I have decided to go to EndoMarch however, is that Endometriosis has robbed me of my dreams for my future and family. It has left me infertile. I have been trying to have a child for over five years with no success. I’ve undergone 8 IUI’s and 1 IVF and suffered one miscarriage. I’ve given myself hundreds of shots in the belly and taken numerous pills in order to overcome my endo so that I can have a child, but to no avail. I suffer mentally from anxiety and depression because of the pain and hopelessness that over takes me.

By going to EndoMarch, I hope to be able to bring awareness to this disease. I want young women to understand how it can affect your fertility so that they might be able to take action sooner, by freezing their eggs or having children earlier. I wish for a future when endo can be diagnosed more easily and earlier, and be treated and cured.

2. Are you going alone or is your husband or someone else going with you?

I will be attending EndoMarch with my husband, Joe.

3. If someone else is going with you, why? Just to support you or does s/he have other reasons? (sightseeing is a totally reasonable answer btw)

My husband will be joining me because he supports me in all things. But also because he sees the agony that this disease causes me. He hopes that I can connect with friends and also doctors that might be able to help me in the future.

4. How has endometriosis affected your life/career/family?

Endometriosis runs almost my whole life anymore. Depending on my pain level, it dictates whether I go to work or if I have a paperwork day at home so that I can rest. It dictates whether I have the energy to visit my family or go out with friends. It leaves me anxious, exhausted and weary. The infertility it has caused has left me barren, which has left me with a deep sadness. Endo and its affects have made me almost antisocial; where I prefer to be at home alone or with my husband, rather than to have to go out in the real world.

5. What is the ONE thing you’d like the public to know about this disease that they likely don’t know?

The major thing I keep seeing is family doctors telling women that they have endometriosis through a testing other than laparoscopy. This recently happened to my niece in law, and I told her to tell her doctor that he could only correctly diagnose via laparoscopy. I want doctors to be more aware of the diagnosis and treatment of endo, that way they can correctly diagnose their patients in a timely manner.

All I can is…WOW. If you didn’t realize it before, perhaps you do now: this disease invades all aspects of your life. It can dictate whether you have children. It can dictate whether you go to work. Or even whether you can hold a job. And many doctors are still clueless about how to diagnose it – let alone treat it.

First I’d like to call your attention to something that Jackie did not mention but alluded to. Some days she can’t make it in to work. There is a concept of spoons that is used for people who suffer chronic pain/illness and it applies to women who suffer from endometriosis. The idea is that you only have so many spoons to get through your day. Some days require more spoons than others. But when you are out of spoons… you are out. You can read about it here. I myself have been lucky to not have many days that required me to count spoons. Others are not so lucky.

And so they are marching. In March. How many spoons will that require? Most likely the sickest will not be able to march. The poorest will not be able to afford to travel. But other women will march for those that cannot.

For more information about this worldwide event and about this disease please see http://www.millionwomenmarch2014.org/

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7 Responses to “Bloggers Unite for EndoMarch: Week Four – An Interview”


  1. I hope to meet you there!


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